New Species Profile for Sharls

The species profile page for sharls is now available. They got kind of a bum position in society, almost always being used as servants or lower employees, and their status is determined by their shell color–some get to (“get to”) serve high-ranking aristocratic wealthy types, others can barely get jobs.

Life can be tough for a sharl.

New species profile added for arkents

Arkents now have a profile on the website! These short, squishy creatures are tentacled and shelled and make quite good seafood. They come from a swampy region of Zhop. Basically, they come from Zhop’s Florida. The first friend our protagonists of Wandering Fortunes meet in New Zhopolis is an arkent, too.

In other news, I finished writing a brand-new chapter for Wandering Fortunes, so I’m going to let that cool off in the back–next week I will finally begin the final edits on the final version of final Darmenzi! It’s going to happen soon! I’m going to have a SECOND book out! Take that– er, wait. No smack-talk. I’ll keep you updated on it! You’ll be even more updated if you become a patron on my Patreon, which is going to get chapter 10 uploaded to here pretty quick!

Now up, Wandering Fortunes chapter 7: The Obsidian City

Chapter 7 of Wandering Fortunes is now up. The Obsidian City, New Zhopolis, finally appears! Big city! Tall buildings! Dim lights!  Innumerable residents! Numerable but still a pretty high number of species! Subways, districts, roads, vehicles, orators, scam artists, grumps, racism, and jerks, jerks, jerks!

Wait, somewhere along the line that took a turn for the worse. Will the big city turn out to be all that it promises to be? Or will it turn out to be more than that and it turned out we just didn’t hear its promises right the first time?

As always, I post these chapters early for $3+ patrons on Patreon, so this chapter has been available for a couple weeks now and patrons will be able to see more of Alden and his friends’ adventures in The Big City in just a couple weeks. Even if you give just one dollar though you still get to see things early, as I post weekly updates that include a snippet of work much further ahead. You can take a look at a bit of chapter ten already!

Species Profile: Crawber

Today let’s talk about one of the more looked-down upon species of Mintop, crawbers. Many consider them buffoons, and they just don’t mind. Quoted from the species appendix in Slubes:

“Crawbers are decapods (crabs, lobsters, crayfish) that are very short, their dimensions being almost equal. They have hard, red outer shells and black, beady eyes. Their bodies are covered in an assortment of small, blunt spikes, and they have two large claws and six thin, pointed legs. Crawbers are often viewed by other species as simple and buffoonish, and though this has come to be seen as an insensitive stereotype, many crawbers are carefree enough to pay it no heed. Their average lifespan is about 50 years.”

Physical Characteristics

Crawbers appear to be somewhere between crabs and lobsters. The outward appearance of the crawber, as quoted from my personal encyclopedia: “Crawbers, at half the height of slubes, have close to the same height, length and width. Crawbers are hard and red, with slight variance in the coloring. They have black, beady eyes and pointy mouth, claws, and legs, the mouth having short, curved spikes on the bottom going up; the two claws together are about half the size of their body, and the legs are numbered at six. They have spikes going down their back, and other spikes on the side of their head. Near the end of their life the shell my crack and fall off, revealing the pink, squishy underskin.”

Crawbers can survive both in and out of water, though they tend to stay up on land; they’re equally clumsy in both areas. Crawber eggs must be laid in water and hatchlings must remain in water until their shell grows or they will dry out; those that live further inland will usually use a large tank of water for this purpose.

History and Culture

It’s said that crawbers came from the sea up onto land and immediately stopped evolving. This is probably one of the speciesist (that’s an awkward word) remarks, but it’s often used to explain why they’re clumsy. So few crawbers live outside the islands of Hackney and Interp that they go practically uncounted in population surveys.

As was said, crawbers are considered by many to be buffoonish and simple-minded. Although in more recent years this has been considered a bad stereotype, they often remain the butt of many jokes. Few crawbers have been seen having a problem with this, though, remaining upbeat and jovial despite what others say. Perhaps it’s not that they’re buffoonish or simple-minded, but they simply don’t let things concern or bother them.